Employment

Disability Rights Oregon provides information, referral, and advocacy services for Oregonians who are having a disability-related legal problem related to employment and licensing for employment.   We can provide assistance to people requiring reasonable accommodations to maintain their jobs; we do not handle failure to hire or termination cases.

 

We also administer Oregon’s Client Assistance Program (CAP), which helps people who are having difficulty seeking or receiving vocational rehabilitation services from Oregon’s Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (OVRS), Independent Living (IL) centers, Oregon’s Commission for the Blind, and tribal programs. Clients who have a wide variety of physical and mental impairments contact DRO when they are having difficulties with the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services.  Often, clients are frustrated when their Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors do not understand their needs, desires, or their point of view.  DRO attorneys intervene to re-establish communication between clients and their counselors, with informal resolutions whenever possible.  If informal resolution is not possible, DRO staff attorneys will file requests for formal administrative hearings, and represent clients at initial hearings and in subsequent appeals.

 

CAP (29 USC § 732, P.L. 105-220) is authorized in the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (last amended and reauthorized in the Workforce Investment Act of 1998) and administered by the U.S. Department of Education, Rehabilitation Services Administration.

Publications

FAQ-Family & Medical Leave

Employment Handbook – 3rd Edition

Brochures

DRO – PABSS brochure

DRO – PABSS brochure – Large Print

DRO – CAP Brochure

DRO – CAP brochure – LargePrint 

DRO-CAP_brochure-2012-SPANISH


 Our latest stories about employment:

At the Legislative Table

Here in Oregon, the legislature is a place where people from different backgrounds and interests can come to do just that: find common ground. That is what democracy is all about. People with disabilities, their families and advocates must be at every table so our voices will be heard. So what did the 2016 legislature do? Continue Reading At the Legislative Table